Panama Posse

 

PANAMA POSSE
 
FLEET UPDATE 

May 28, 2023

“Those who train their hearts in natural wonder shall forever know the rivers, forests, wildflowers, and oceans, as friends.”

― Atalina Wright, ‎Wild Riverbanks

TOP NEWS  

  • SEASON 6 AWARD WINNERS
  • JUNE 4TH CELEBRATE SEASON 6 ON OUR ZOOM CALL 
  •  FLOATING & WATERPROOF HANDHELD VHF ON SALE
  • SAILDRONES ARE MAPPING SUPERSTORMS
  • TITUSVILLE MARINA 🇺🇸 SPONSORS THE PANAMA POSSE
  • GOOD NAUTICAL: HURRICANE HOLE: BOGUE LAGOON
  • PATOIS CULTURE OF 🇯🇲 JAMAICA
  • PICTURES OF THE WEEK FROM THE FLEET
  • CALL TO ACTION: SHARE YOUR STORIES LIKE THIS ONE…
  • HURRICANE SEASON STARTS JUNE 1ST: PREPAREDNESS MANUAL 
  •  🇺🇸 CASTILLO SAN MARCOS, ST AUGUSTINE FLORIDA
 

EARLY 
SIGN UP FOR
 PANAMA POSSE  
23·24 
 

1) CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL

SEASON 6 AWARD WINNERS

CONGRATULATIONS

Each award winner receives one bottle of 12 year old Flor de Caña RUM by master mix-ologist

CONGRATULATIONS

The view from the Boga Bar with free flowing rum !

CONGRATULATIONS

The Panama Posse revelers are gathering at Vista Mar Marina / Boga Bar 

CONGRATULATIONS

Capt Dietmar and the Vista Mar team with Cesar 

CONGRATULATIONS

Decorations and treats for all – a special thank you to Boga Bar and Vista Mar Marina for hosting such a lovely event

VISTA MAR MARINA

THE 22-23 PANAMA POSSE AWARD WINNERS 

 

BIGGEST FISH CAUGHT – IT’S A TIE

CONGRATULATIONS NICOLE

  Nicole on Maison De Sante with a 48″ Dorado  

lighthouse in ecuador

 Kyle on SY JUBEL with a 48″ as well Dorado off the coast of Acapulco, Mexico

GALLEY GODDESS AWARD

GALLEY GODDESS

WINNER SELECTED BY THE SECRET FOOD JUDGES

THE COUSCOUS SALAD  

awarded at the kick off event in Barra de Navidad, Mexico 

SY HULA KAI 🇺🇸 Richard & Kathleen –Tayana DS 48′

HULU KAI RickHUKU KAI Kathleen

YODA OF THE YEAR AWARD

YODA OF THE YAR AWARD

14 new  safe tracks through the Belize reef system shared in Good Nautical 

YODA OF THE YAR AWARD

SY ISLAND BOUND 🇺🇸 Bill & Melissa Kelly – Peterson 44′

DA MMAD CAT Danny

SPEEDY AWARD

SPEEDY AWARD

Canada BC to North Carolina  in one season

SY PELERIN 🇨🇦  Michael & Shirley – Alubat 43′

‘CAPTAIN RON AWARDS

CAPTAIN RON AWARD 2022-2023

SY LADY SLIPPER  🇺🇸  John & Kathryn – Dufour 41′

lady slipper katieJohn Dunmire, Lady Slipper
CAPTAIN RON AWARD 2022-2023

SY CARINTHIA 🇺🇸  Dietmar  – Lagoon 440′

deferred the first prize to above LADY SLIPPER due to embarrassment  of running into a reef hard stop

Dietmar

MOST UNWELCOME VISITOR ONBOARD

AWARD

MOST UNWELCOME VISITOR ONBOARD AWARD

whatever you are doing onboard – no bueno – your are welcome to leave anytime !

SY PACIFIC BLUE 🇳🇱 Hans & Irene Breehorn 44′

NO PICTURE

2) SAVE THESE DATES: 

 

JUNE 1ST : MARKS THE OFFICIAL 

START TO HURRICANE SEASON

HURRICAN SPIRAL

THE OFF SEASON GOAL ?

 YOU AND/OR YOUR BOAT ARE IN OR NEAR A SAFE SPOT 

TO AVOID HURRICANE FORCES !

this is the link to the 7 day outlook >> 

Forcast

 

HURRICANE

 

SAVE THE DATE: 

END OF SEASON 6 ZOOM CALL

GRAB A BEER WINE OR COCKTAIL AND TIME TO CHAT 

LET’S WRAP THE SEASON WITH PANAMA POSSE YACHTS

 @

JUNE 4TH  2023

15:00 PACIFIC  TIME

16:00 MEXICO TIME

17:00 PM PANAMA TIME 

18:00 EASTERN DAYLIGHT TIME

 

https://panamaposse.com/zoom

 

JOIN US, SHARE STORIES, AND SEASON HIGHLIGHTS 

ALL IN ZOOM  FOLLOW THIS LINK ON SUNDAY JUNE 4th  

 

VIRTUALY

 

3) MORE AWARD WINNERS

💨

HIGHEST WIND RECORDED

3) MORE AWARD WINNERS 💨 HIGHEST WIND RECORDED

SY STRAYCAT 2 🇨🇦   Derick & Barb – Lagoon 38′

STRAY_CAT STRAY_CAT

SPIRIT OF 🧭

EXPLORATION

AWARD

SPIRIT OF EXPLORATION AWARD

SY PATHFINDER 🇺🇸  Jean-Philippe & Nicole –  Lagoon 39′

PATHFINDER Jean-PhilippePATHFINDER Nicole

GOOD SAMARITAN OF THE YEAR AWARD

For
altering course responding to Carinthia’s Pan Pan / subsequent
assistance in providing emergency bildge pumps and subsequent monitoring
of Carinthia on a 50 nm track to the boatyard.

SY ENJOY 🇺🇸  Don & Nina – Lagoon 42′

ENJOY NinaENJOY Don

BOAT YOGA 🧘 

POSES OF THE SEASON

    

BOAT YOGA 🧘 POSES OF THE SEASON

SY TULUM5 🇺🇸  Chad, Michelle & Teagan – Chung Hua 51′

TULUM V Crew

✊ COURAGE AWARD ✊

✊ COURAGE AWARD ✊

SY  CONSTELLATION 🇺🇸  Cory & Chris & Stella – Freedom 45′

CONSTELLATIONCONSTELLATION

PICTURE OF THE YEAR AWARD

SY WHIRLWIND 🇺🇸 – Mike, Maurisa & Crew – Alajuela 48′

WHIRLWINDWHIRLWINDWHIRLWINDWHIRLWIND

4) SPECIAL OFFER FOR YOUR MEMBERS IN  PANAMA

FLOATING & WATERPROOF HANDHELD VHF ON SALE NOW THRU MAY 31ST 

SPECIAL OFFER FOR YOUR MEMBERS IN PANAMA FLOATING & WATERPROOF HANDHELD VHF ON SALE NOW THRU MAY 31ST

Free
delivery to anywhere in Republic of Panama from 21st. of May, 2023 till
31st. of May, 2023. Apply to prepaid customers only, via PayPal.  

CHARGES VIA USB TYPE C !

Limited to 5 per customer  only

CONTACT

Nick TEE

 

Marineg Panama:

Voz: +507 6000-0001

SMS: +507 6611-9385

WhatsApp: +507  6982-4001

 

Marineg USA:

Voice: +1 (747) 200-9391

Text: +1 (747) 200-9391

WhatsApp: +1 (747) 666-0388

HAPPY RENEW

   
RENEW NOW
PANAMA POSSE SEASON 7 
  

5) SAILDRONES ARE MAPPING SUPERSTORMS 

AND HELPING SCIENTISTS BETTER UNDERSTAND

OUR OCEANS

5) SAILDRONES ARE MAPPING SUPERSTORMS AND HELPING SCIENTISTS BETTER UNDERSTAND OUR OCEANS

Saildrones equipped with a range of sensors to collect a broad scope of data

Hurricane season in the Atlantic is near and Saildrones are preparing for another season of observations.

Saildrones
have been helping scientists map superstorms at sea and collect data to
better understand rapid-intensification of superstorms for only a few
years. The Saildrone is a 23-foot craft that has been designed, built
and engineered to point into the absolute worst weather conditions a
hurricane can offer.  The vessel is adorned with a host of
meteorological and oceanographic instruments powered by wind, water and
sun to collect and send data on land.  The goal is to collect air,
surface, and subsea data in real time.  The data is meant to help
scientists develop a more sophisticated understanding of why such
storms’ intensity has spiked over the last half-century.  Storms
are going through rapid-intensification, lasting longer, tracking
further inland and farther north than they have historically threatening
millions of coastal residents in the United States from Texas to Maine.

Saildrones have been helping scientists map superstorms at sea and collect data to better understand rapid-intensification of superstorms for only a few years. The Saildrone is a 23-foot craft that has been designed, built and engineered to point into the absolute worst weather conditions a hurricane can offer. The vessel is adorned with a host of meteorological and oceanographic instruments powered by wind, water and sun to collect and send data on land. The goal is to collect air, surface, and subsea data in real time. The data is meant to help scientists develop a more sophisticated understanding of why such storms’ intensity has spiked over the last half-century. Storms are going through rapid-intensification, lasting longer, tracking further inland and farther north than they have historically threatening millions of coastal residents in the United States from Texas to Maine. grave under water

The Saildrone is one of many tools in service collecting data

A
handful of these bright orange, unmanned , remotely piloted vessels
have been built and launched in the Atlantic ocean patrolling the
Carribean for storms. In 2021, one in particular, called Saildrone
Explorer SD 1045, with it’s a 15’ rigid carbon-fiber sail and a deep
keel managed to truly weather and help map a storm, Hurricane Sam.
Steering on the edge of the eye wall of Hurricane Sam, this
Saildrone 1045 found 143 mph gusts, measured 89-foot waves, recorded
multiple knockdowns, 360-degree capsizes and a 30-mph surf down the back
of a giant wave.  

Saildrones have been helping scientists map superstorms at sea and collect data to better understand rapid-intensification of superstorms for only a few years. The Saildrone is a 23-foot craft that has been designed, built and engineered to point into the absolute worst weather conditions a hurricane can offer. The vessel is adorned with a host of meteorological and oceanographic instruments powered by wind, water and sun to collect and send data on land. The goal is to collect air, surface, and subsea data in real time. The data is meant to help scientists develop a more sophisticated understanding of why such storms’ intensity has spiked over the last half-century. Storms are going through rapid-intensification, lasting longer, tracking further inland and farther north than they have historically threatening millions of coastal residents in the United States from Texas to Maine. grave under water

Saildrone captures images of frothy intensity near the eye of Hurricane Same

Scientists
the world over are investigating, comparing and hypothesizing about
climate changes in the past, present, and future.  Scientists seek
answers that will help predict and avoid environmental and human
disasters.

More and more storms are doing what is called rapid intensification.  Scientists have not known why.  Of
particular interest to the scientists monitoring Saildrone 1045 in 2021
was data that indicated that as Hurricane Sam went through rapid
intensification the sea temperature was warming
not cooling and the
salinity was lower.  This information was so ‘off’ from what was
expected that the data put the Saildrone’s instruments in question.
However, comparing Saildrone data to nearby buoy ad satellite data
confirmed that the instruments were in fact in good working order.
Now it was not the instruments in question but rather a discovery
that led to more questions. Scientists concluded that there was a pool
of fresh water floating on the ocean surface under the eye.  This
pool was obstructing ocean upwelling and evaporation beneath the
hurricane from cooling the ocean water and thereby tempering the storm.
But Why?  …and How did this pool form?  Where did the freshwater come from?

Saildrones have been helping scientists map superstorms at sea and collect data to better understand rapid-intensification of superstorms for only a few years. The Saildrone is a 23-foot craft that has been designed, built and engineered to point into the absolute worst weather conditions a hurricane can offer. The vessel is adorned with a host of meteorological and oceanographic instruments powered by wind, water and sun to collect and send data on land. The goal is to collect air, surface, and subsea data in real time. The data is meant to help scientists develop a more sophisticated understanding of why such storms’ intensity has spiked over the last half-century. Storms are going through rapid-intensification, lasting longer, tracking further inland and farther north than they have historically threatening millions of coastal residents in the United States from Texas to Maine. grave under water

This
image provided by the NOAA showing Transmit data from a saildrone in
(what was) real-time to operational weather prediction centers to
improve atmosphere-ocean initial conditions in forecast models.

Scientist are looking near and far for the answers to these questions. 

We
live on but one planet and scientists often illuminate interconnections
on our planet that were once thought to be distant and disconnected.
Catherine McKenzie wrote in her book, Fractured,

 “They
say that if a butterfly flaps its wings in the Amazonian rain forest,
it can change the weather half a world away. Chaos theory. What it means
is that everything that happens in this moment is an accumulation of
everything that’s come before it. Every breath. Every thought. There is
no innocent action. Some actions end up having the force of a tempest.
Their impact cannot be missed. Others are the blink of an eye. Passing
by unnoticed. Perhaps only God knows which is which.  

All
I know today is that you can think that what you’ve done is only the
flap of a butterfly wing, when it’s really a thunderclap. And both can
result in a hurricane”

Balance

A precious balance of forces exist in our world inspiring scientists to question cause and effect, to look deeply at humans place in this balance. Many believe humans indeed tip the scales somewhere, somehow, or in some way and spend their life's work seeking this understanding.

A
precious balance of forces exist in our world inspiring scientists to
question cause and effect, to look deeply at humans place in this
balance.  

Many
believe humans indeed tip the scales somewhere, somehow, or in some way
and spend their life’s work seeking this understanding.

The
conclusion about the freshwater pool has inspired new research around
salinity levels in the ocean, how they are changing and the causes for,
in this case, a pool of intense dilution.   Rising sea
temperatures?  Melting iceburgs?  Increased rainfall?
Deforestation?  

All
of this data and these questions are relevant in all the world’s
Oceans, not just the Atlantic.  Superstorms may be billed under
different names in different oceans, IE typhoons in the Northwest
Pacific, Cyclones in the South Pacific and Hurricanes in the Atlantic,
but their trend and impacts are the same.  The world over
Superstorms are growing stronger as the ocean warms beneath them and
wreaking havoc on human life and structures.

“About
a third of the world’s population has no access to
extreme-weather-early-warning systems- including a stunning 60 percent
of people in Africa.”  The disproportionate impact of storms in
communities without forecasting systems let alone electricity is
staggering.  “Oceanographers often point out that appropriations
for NASA’s deep-space exploration outpaces ocean exploration by more
than 150 to 1- to the point that scientists know more about the surface
of Mars than they do about our own seas, which play an outsize role in
the climate crisis and are far more important to the survival of our
species.”  Some scientists refer to this as a black hole of data.

As
people that live on and spend a lot of time on the Ocean we are
intimately connected to the salty sea and the weather.  It is worth
reading about this exciting and relevant research: 

 

SWIRLER

 

Saildrone
1045 location (triangle) overlaid on an infrared image from NOAA
geostationary satellite (colors) at 16:00 UTC September 30, 2021. The
saildrone track (light blue line) starts at 04:00 UTC on the same day.
Courtesy of Edorado Mazza, University of Washington.

6)  MEET THE NEWEST PANAMA POSSE

🇺🇸 MARINA SPONSOR

 

6) MEET THE NEWEST PANAMA POSSE 🇺🇸 MARINA SPONSOR

 

Titusville Marina Florida 🇺🇸 Sponsors the Panama Posse

28° 37.2466′ N 080° 48.5316′ W

We are pleased to sponsor the Panama Posse and offer

10 % discount off our short term docking rate

Please
let the Posse know that dock age reservations may be made directly
through our website, or by giving us a call at 321.383.5600

 

Tom Lawson Titusville Marina

Tom Lawson​

General Manager

TITUSVILLE MARINA AMENITIES

AMENITIES

    Public Launch Ramps

    Newly Remodeled Ship Store

    WiFi

    Pump Out Station and Boat Available

    Diving Services

    1 Hour to Orlando Attractions

    New Indoor Captain’s Lounge

    Newly Remodeled Bathrooms

    Gas & Diesel

    Laundry Facilities

    Nearby Restaurants

    5 Minutes to Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge

    10 Minutes to Canaveral National Seashore

    Grocery Store Within Walking Distance

 

CONTACT INFO

Tel +1 321-383-5600

tlawson@f3marina.com

451 Marina Rd, Titusville, FL 32796, USA

AMENITIES Public Launch Ramps Newly Remodeled Ship Store WiFi Pump Out Station and Boat Available Diving Services 1 Hour to Orlando Attractions New Indoor Captain’s Lounge Newly Remodeled Bathrooms Gas & Diesel Laundry Facilities Nearby Restaurants 5 Minutes to Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge 10 Minutes to Canaveral National Seashore Grocery Store Within Walking Distance

7) GOOD ANCHORAGE 

IN GOOD  NAUTICAL

BOGUE LAGOON: HURRICANE HOLE JAMAICA

 18° 27.393′ N 077° 56.5265′ W  

  Excellent for protection- a bonafide HURRICANE HOLE 

Bogue Lagoon Excellent for protection- a bonafide HURRICANE HOLE

View
from the Richmond Hill Inn (500’ above the bay) includes the Montego
Bay Yacht Club and anchorage area. The area directly behind the club is
Bogue Lagoon.

BOGUE LAGOON ANCHORAGE - from the FREE CRUISING GUIDE TO JAMAICA by Frank Virgintino archived in https://panamamposse.com/books

BOGUE LAGOON ANCHORAGE SKETCH-

 from the FREE CRUISING GUIDE TO JAMAICA by Frank Virgintino 

archived in https://panamamposse.com/books

“Once past the buoy there is a series of markers — rusted and old, but

serviceable — to lead you in. Do not shortcut any of them. Their colors are

faded, so you need to stay alert. Do not even think about entering at night.

 

This anchorage should be used in heavy “northers” or even hurricanes. It is

well protected with good holding. There is a Houseboat restaurant in the

lagoon; you can anchor close by and dinghy over to enjoy a really nice meal.

The entrance channel carries 7’ of water. If you need more, wait for a high

tide which will give you another foot. Once inside, the depth in the

anchorage area is between 15’ and 20’.

Unless you like this type of anchorage, there is nothing to recommend here

other than avoiding heavy weather. This is mangrove country so when the

wind is down, mosquitoes can be merciless. Check your mosquito screens.”

BOGUE LAGOON IN GOOD NAUTICAL

8) PATOIS CULTURE OF 🇯🇲 JAMAICA

Patois
is a fascinating linguistic and cultural phenomenon, reflecting the
history, resilience, and creativity of the Jamaican people. It’s an
integral part of the local culture, contributing to the vibrant and
diverse tapestry of Jamaica’s heritage.

Patois is a fascinating linguistic and cultural phenomenon, reflecting the history, resilience, and creativity of the Jamaican people. It's an integral part of the local culture, contributing to the vibrant and diverse tapestry of Jamaica's heritage.

The
vocabulary draws from a range of sources, including English, African
languages, Spanish, and Indigenous Taino words. Many words and phrases
have specific cultural or local meanings that may not be immediately
apparent to non-native speakers. Jamaican Patois also includes unique
idiomatic expressions and proverbs that reflect the island’s history,
traditions, and way of life.

 

 

Reggae
music evolved from earlier Jamaican musical genres such as ska and
rocksteady, but it also drew inspiration from African rhythms and
religious practices. The lyrics of reggae songs often address social and
political issues, promoting messages of liberation, unity, and
resistance against oppression. Many reggae songs express themes of
empowerment, equality, and the celebration of Jamaican identity and
culture.

The
connection between the slave uprisings and reggae music is evident in
the lyrics of influential reggae artists such as Bob Marley, Peter Tosh,
and Burning Spear, among others. Their songs often speak to the history
of slavery, the struggles faced by the African diaspora, and the quest
for justice and equality. Through their music, they helped raise
awareness of Jamaica’s history and cultural heritage on a global scale.

Furthermore,
the rhythmic elements of reggae, with its distinctive bass lines,
offbeat guitar strumming, and syncopated drumming, can be traced back to
African musical traditions brought to Jamaica during the era of
slavery. This rhythmic foundation, combined with the socio-political
messages of the lyrics, contributed to reggae’s unique and influential
sound.

Painting by Adolphe Duperly depicting the Roehampton Estate in St. James, Jamaica, being destroyed by fire during the uprising.

Painting
by Adolphe Duperly depicting the Roehampton Estate in St. James,
Jamaica, being destroyed by fire during the uprising.  

The
legacy of the slave uprisings, along with the experiences of slavery
and oppression, deeply influenced Jamaican culture, providing a
foundation for the emergence of various cultural expressions, including
music. Reggae, which gained international recognition and became a
symbol of Jamaican culture, has roots deeply connected to the historical
struggles for freedom and social justice.

Chronology of Resistance in the West Indies – JAMAICA 

A= dozens, B=hundreds, C=Thousands, D=Many Thousand Slaves

 

1655-1670 B. Resistance by “Spanish negroes” Lubolode Serras, and others.

1673 B. Revolt of Coromantee slaves, Lobby’s estate, St Ann’s parish.

1678 B. Large – scale running away, St. Mary’s Parish.

1685 B. July. Revolt on Grey’s estate, Guanaboa Vale.

1690 B. July. Revolt centred on Sutton’s estate, Clarendon parish, led by Cudjoe the elder.

1730-1740 C. First Maroon War, involving Cudjoe the younger, nanny, and many other leaders.

1742 A. Christmas. Coromantee plot, St James’s parish.

1745 B. New Year. Plot mainly by African slaves, St. David’s parish.

1760
D. Tacky’s revolt, dominated by Coromantee slaves, Originating in St.
Mary’s parish at easter but spreading Widely through island around
whitsun.

1765 A. November. Coromantee uprising, St Mary’s parish, led by Blackwall.

1766 C. Coromantee uprising, Westmoreland parish.

1776 C. July. Afro – Creole, Hanover parish, led by Sam, Charles, Caesar, and others.

1791-1792 B. Island- wide slave unrest after news from Haiti.

1795-1796 B. July – March. Second Maroon war in Trelawny and St. James’s parish.

1806 A. Plot in St. George’s parish.

1808 B. Mutiny of the Second West India Regiment and plot in Kingston.

1815 B. Christmas. Ibo – led plot, St. Elizabeth’s parish.

1819 B. Epidemic of running away throughout the island.

1823-1824 C. Widespread plots and unrest, especially in Hanover parish, where it was properly called the “Argyle War.”

1828 A. Expedition against a troublesome band of runaways Behind Dromilly estate, Trelawny parish.

1831-1832 D. Christmas. “Baptist War” in western Jamaica, led by Samuel Sharpe and others.

How Jamaica records and preserves is audible culture

How Jamaica records and preserves is audible culture 

 

 

9) PICTURES OF THE WEEK FROM THE POSSE

colorful belize

Dropped
off crew and are staging the boat for the next round of family coming
to charter with us for a week 😭 Exhausted is an understatement LOL

LA VIDA GYPSEA

Excited to check out this beautiful country for the next 30 days before hauling out in Rio Dulce, Guatemala.

SY LA VIDA GYPSEA   🇺🇸 Kurt, Linda, Rigby – Catana 47′

LA VIDA Rigby
 

▶️ Sailing La Vida Gypsea @SailingLaVidaGypsea

 

La Paz Sunse Baja California 🇲🇽 Mexico

La Paz Sunse Baja California 🇲🇽 Mexico

SY SERENITY 🇺🇸 Mark & Kathryn – Antares 44′

SERENITY Kathryn
Bahia Santa Elena Sunset, Guanacaste, 🇨🇷 Costa Rica

SY WHIRLWIND 🇺🇸 – Mike, Maurisa, Russell, & Josea – Alajuela 48′

 

10)  PLEASE SHARE YOUR END OF SEASON STORIES 
AND HIGHLIGHTS

Among
the Panama Posse  are  great adventurers and often in
landscapes  are breathtakingly beautiful, poignant, or fascinating
in some way.  Please share you photos either on the Line App
for the group to enjoy or feel free to send pictures with captions or
short accompanying stories to me at
editor@panamaposse.com.
Every week I assemble the newsletter with information from the
fleet and for the fleet.  If you think it is newsworthy, send it to
me and I will do my best to include it.  

Russel

 

 

Budding Sailor and Fisherman extraordinaire, Russell, catches an African Pompano

 Bahia Santa Elena, Guanacaste, 🇨🇷 Costa Rica

“I woke up at 5:30 in the morning.   The sun was up and it was hot
all ready.   I asked my dad if he wanted to go fishing and began
preparing our 11’ inflatable dingy while he drank his morning cup of
coffee.  We went out of the small cove where we were anchored and
to the first large rock at the entrance to the Bay.  

Entrance Rocks Looking good for fishing

We
fished at the entrance rock for awhile and all we caught was a small
starry grouper.  Then we went out to the small island in the mouth
of the bay where we jigged for a bit.  After jigging for about five
minutes we noticed that the dingy was taking on water.  So, we
started to troll back.  Along the way we got 3 bites but no fish.
We were almost back to our mothership, Whirlwind, and wondering,
“Maybe it is the lure?  Maybe the lure doesn’t work?”.  

the route of an adventurer

No
sooner had we finished asking these questions when we got a big bite!
Immediately, the rod started screamin’.  After a bit of a
fight, I pulled in a big pompano.  We went to the beach and started
fileting it.  While we were fileting it we saw a monster roster
fish.   My dad tried to catch it but know luck.  We are
cooking up the Pompano up know and after that I intend to catch that
rooster…if I can.”

Thanks for sharing Russell! This African Pompano met it's match.

Thanks for sharing Russell!  This African Pompano met it’s match.

SY WHIRLWIND 🇺🇸 – Mike, Maurisa, Russell, & Josea – Alajuela 48′

 

11) PANAMA POSSE SHOP

 

about:blank

 


 $24.99
PANAMA POSSE MARINER CAP

PANAMA POSSE MARINER Cap

PANAMA POSSE OCEAN Classics – Mariner Cap

COLORS: WHITE –  NAVY Visor & Mesh

    65/35 polyester/cotton

    Mesh back

    Structured, mid-profile, six-panel

    Permacurv visor

    Matching undervisor

    Adjustable Snapback closure

12)  ⚠️ ALERTS 

  •     HURRICANE MANUAL
  •     EL NIÑO
  •     HIGH WAVES PACIFIC PANAMA 

Hurricane!
The word is both feared and respected by knowledgeable mariners and old
timers along the U.S. Coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico and the
Atlantic Ocean. Residents of Southeast Florida are constantly alert to
the news of tropical storms developing in or headed for the Atlantic
Ocean or Caribbean Sea, or Gulf of Mexico. This interest is at its
highest during the official hurricane season from June 1st to November
30.

A
hurricane is a violent tropical cyclone, with winds of 74 or more miles
per hour, which spiral counterclockwise around a relatively calm center
known as the “eye” of the storm. At full strength hurricane winds can
gust to more than 200 miles per hour as far out as 20 to 30 miles from
the eye. Winds of 39 mph and greater can extend 200 miles or more in
advance of the hurricane and trail hundreds of miles behind. The
greatest threat from hurricane wind is flying debris. Winds may also
disrupt electrical power, telephone service, gas, fresh water supplies,
and transportation. Tornados are also possible as a spinoff of the
hurricane’s winds.

The
greatest danger of the hurricane, however, is from the storm surge. As
the storm approaches and moves across a coastline, storm surge may rise
10 feet or more above normal high tide and usually is accompanied by
battering waves which will overcome coastal lowlands. In addition,
extensive rainfall associated with the storm, may cause widespread
flooding further inland. More than 23 inches of rainfall in 24 hours
have been recorded in association with a hurricane.

Hurricanes are classified by wind strength known as the Saffir/Simpson Scale:

 

Category : Wind

I :                74-95 mph

II :               96-110 mph

III:               111-130 mph

IV:              131-155 mph

V :              156 + mph

Tropical Depression – A circulation at the surface of the water with a sustained wind speed of 38 mph.

Tropical Storm – Distinct circulation with sustained wind speeds of 39 to 73 mph.

Hurricane – A tropical cyclone that rotates counterclockwise with sustained winds of 74 mph or greater.

Tropical Storm Watch – The alert given when a tropical storm poses a threat to a certain coastal area within 36 hours.

Tropical Storm Warning – A tropical storm is expected to strike within 24 hrs. with sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph.

Hurricane Watch – The alert given when a hurricane poses a threat to a certain coastal area within 36 hrs.

Hurricane Warning
A hurricane is expected to strike within 24 hours with sustained winds
of 74 mph or more accompanied by heavy rain and high waves.

Storm Surge
A rise in tide caused by a hurricane as it moves over or near the
coastline. It can be much higher than the normal tidal rise, with
breaking waves on top.

Beyond the definitions the manual has information on

Beyond the definitions the manual has information on

  1.     General Precautions for Boat Owners
  2.     General Precautions for Boat Owners
  3.     Specific Precautions for Boat Owners
  4.     What do do Before and After a Hurricane
  5.     General Procedures to Process Vessel Claims
  6.     Boat Owner’s Preparation Worksheet

    A Template to fill in with important numbers that one would need in case of a hurricane emergency

Important Points

• Develop your hurricane plan early. Only you can be responsible for your plan.

• Make all arrangements for moving and securing your vessel prior to

hurricane season.

• There are insufficient safe havens for all vessels in the county. Those who

act early will fare the best.

• Do not stay on your vessel, or attempt to move or secure your vessel after

small craft warnings have been posted.

• Do not be fooled by the lull or calm as the eye passes. The second half of

the storm will soon strike with full intensity.

• Marine agencies will pull their vessels from the water when wind and seas

warrant. They will not risk their lives to rescue careless boaters.

• Stay tuned to all broadcasts and official bulletins until the storm has fully abated.

• Do not return to your vessel until the hurricane has cleared your area and you are told its OK to return.

• Your life is more valuable than your property. Do not allow yourself to become a hurricane statistic! 


DOWNLOAD THIS HURRICANE MANUAL AND HOW TO PREPARE FOR SEVERE STORM EVENTS >>

DOWNLOAD THIS HURRICANE MANUAL AND HOW TO PREPARE FOR SEVERE STORM EVENTS >>

EL NIÑO

Many fish that live in the normally cooler waters off the coast of South America move away or die. Fishermen first called this condition of warm coastal water and poor fishing

Many
fish that live in the normally cooler waters off the coast of South
America move away or die. Fishermen first called this condition of warm
coastal water and poor fishing “El Niño.” El Niño means “the Christ
Child.” They call it that because it typically occurs at
Christmastime. 

This
information about sea surface temperature can allow scientists to more
accurately detect conditions such as El Niño while they are forming.

There
is a 60% chance for a transition from ENSO-neutral to El Niño during
May-July 2023, and this will increase to about 70% in June-August and
80% between July and September, according to the Update, which is based
on input from WMO Global Producing Centres of Long-Range Forecasts and
expert assessment

 

During
El Niño years, the Atlantic Ocean tends to be cooler than normal, which
can create a more stable atmosphere and increase wind shear, making it
more difficult for hurricanes to form and intensify. Therefore, El Niño
years tend to have fewer and weaker hurricanes in the Atlantic basin.

 

During
an El Niño year, the sea surface temperatures in the eastern Pacific
tend to be warmer than normal, which creates a more unstable atmosphere
and decrease wind shear, making it easier for hurricanes to form and
intensify.

As a result, El Niño years tend to have more and stronger hurricanes in the eastern Pacific basin.  

HIGH WAVE ALERT PANAMA

HIGH WAVE ALERT

HIGH WAVE ALERT

HIGH WAVE ALERT

13)  MUST SEE: 

CASTILLO SAN MARCOS 🇺🇸  ST AUGUSTINE FLORIDA

The
Castillo de San Marcos is the oldest masonry fort in the continental
United Statesand is located on the western shore of Matanzas Bay in the
city of St. Augustine, Florida. The Castillo was designed by the Spanish
engineer Ignacio Daza and construction begn in 1672, 107 years after
the city’s founding by Spanish Admiral and conquistador Pedro Menéndez
de Avilés, when Florida was part of the Spanish Empire.

Distinct shape of Castillo San Marcos from above.

Distinct shape of Castillo San Marcos from above.

Castillo
de San Marcos was for many years the northernmost outpost of Spain’s
vast New World empire. It is the oldest masonry fort and the
best-preserved ex-ample of a Spanish colonial fortification in the
continental United States. This Fort anchored East Florida’s defenses,
which extended northward to the St. Mary’s River, westward to the St.
Johns, and southward to Fort Matanzas. It protected St. Augustine from
pirate raids and from Spain’s major rival, Great Britain, during a time
when the Florida-Georgia-Carolina coastline was an explosive
international battleground.

Distinct shape of Castillo San Marcos from above.

The
roots of the Castillo’s history reach back to the years just after
Christopher Columbus’s final transatlantic voyage, when conquistadors
carved out a vast and wealthy overseas empire for Spain, first in the
Caribbean and then on the mainland of Mexico, Central America,
Colombia,
Venezuela, and Peru. Products of these tropical and mountainous
territories brought high prices on the Continent, and Spanish galleons
sailed home laden with exotic dyes, sugar, tobacco, chocolate, pearls,
hardwoods, and silver and gold. These so-called “treasure fleets” made
Spain the most powerful and envied nation in Renaissance Europe.

Thanks to the travels of Ponce de Leon in 1513, Spanish navigators knew that the best return route from Spain’s rich Caribbean possessions was along the Gulf Stream, through the Bahama Channel, and past the shores of Florida. The Spanish knew they must defend this peninsula to prevent enemies from using its harbors as havens from which to raid the passing treasure fleets.

Thanks
to the travels of Ponce de Leon in 1513, Spanish navigators knew that
the best return route from Spain’s rich Caribbean possessions was along
the Gulf Stream, through the Bahama Channel, and past the shores of
Florida. The Spanish knew they must defend this peninsula to prevent
enemies from using its harbors as havens from which to raid the passing
treasure fleets.

The Castillo’s baptism of fire came in 1702 during the War of the Spanish Succession, when the English occupied St. Augustine and unsuccessfully besieged the fort for 50 days. The English burned the town before they left, but the Castillo emerged unscathed, thereby making it a symbolic link between the old St. Augustine of 1565 and the new city that rose from the ashes.

The
Castillo’s baptism of fire came in 1702 during the War of the Spanish
Succession, when the English occupied St. Augustine and unsuccessfully
besieged the fort for 50 days. The English burned the town before they
left, but the Castillo emerged unscathed, thereby making it a symbolic
link between the old St. Augustine of 1565 and the new city that rose
from the ashes.

The Castillo’s baptism of fire came in 1702 during the War of the Spanish Succession, when the English occupied St. Augustine and unsuccessfully besieged the fort for 50 days. The English burned the town before they left, but the Castillo emerged unscathed, thereby making it a symbolic link between the old St. Augustine of 1565 and the new city that rose from the ashes.

CASTILLO SAN MARCOS TIMELINE

1513 Sailing from Puerto Rico, Spanish claim Florida.

1565 Spanish found St. Augustine and destroy French at Fort Caroline and Matanzas Inlet.

1672 Ground is broken on October 2 for Castillo de San Marcos.

1695 Castillo de San Marcos (curtain walls, bastions, living quarters, moat, ravelin, and sea-wall) is finished in August.

1702
War of the Spanish Succession pits Spain and France against Austria,
Great Britain, and others.  Coastal  Georgia missions are
destroyed by Carolinians en route to St. Augustine.  Carolinians
occupy and burn St. Augustine but the Castillo successfully resists
their siege.

1738
Spanish governor at St. Augustine grants freedom to runaway British
slaves. Black families settle at new town called Fort Mose.

1740
St. Augustine successfully endures siege by British, Georgian, and
South Carolinian forces. Spanish attack and de-feat British Highland
troops camped at Fort Mose.

1740-42 Fort Matanzas is built to block southern approach to St. Augustine.

1756-62 Fort Mose re-built in masonry. Earth-works at Mose extended to complete northern-most defense.

1763 Peace of Paris gives Florida to Great Britain in exchange for La Habana.  Castillo becomes known as Fort St. Mark.

1783 Peace of Paris recognizes independence of the United States and returns Florida to Spain.

1821 Spain cedes Florida to the United States.

1825 Castillo de San Marcos renamed Fort Marion.

1924 Fort Marion and Fort Matanzas are proclaimed national monuments

1933 Transferred to the National Parks Service

1942 Original name Castillo San Marcos is restored

 

MUST SEE PANAMA POSSE

 

 

14)  75+ PANAMA POSSE MARINA SPONSORS 

16) 75+ PANAMA POSSE MARINA SPONSORS 

🇺🇸 Safe Harbor South Bay – Chula Vista, USA

🇺🇸 Safe Harbor Ventura Isle –  Ventura, USA

🇲🇽 Cruise Port Village – Mexico

🇲🇽 IGY Marina Cabo San Lucas  – Mexico  

🇲🇽 Marina Puerto Escondido – Mexico

🇲🇽 Marina Palmira Topolobampo – Mexico

🇲🇽 Marina y Club de Yates Isla Cortes – Mexico

🇲🇽 Marina el Cid – Mazatlan – Mexico

🇲🇽 Marina Vallarta, Puerto Vallarta – Mexico  

🇲🇽 PANAMA POSSE HQ  – Marina Puerto de La Navidad – Mexico  

🇲🇽 Marina Ixtapa, Ixtapa – Mexico 

🇲🇽 La Marina Acapulco, Acapulco – Mexico  

🇲🇽 Vicente’s Moorings, Acapulco – Mexico 

🇲🇽 Marina Chiapas – Mexico  

🇬🇹 Marina Pez Vela – Guatemala  

🇸🇻 Marina Bahia del Sol – El Salvador  

🇸🇻 La Palma Moorings – Bahia del Sol – El Salvador

🇳🇮 Marina Puesta del Sol – Nicaragua  

🇨🇷 Marina Papagayo – Costa Rica  

🇨🇷 Banana Bay Marina – Costa Rica  

🇪🇨 Marina Puerto Amistad – Ecuador  

🇵🇦 Buenaventura Marina – Panama 

🇵🇦 PANAMA POSSE PACIFIC HQ Vista Mar Marina – Panama 

🇵🇦 Shelter Bay Marina – Panama  

🇵🇦 Bocas Marina – Panama 

🇵🇦 Linton Bay Marina – Panama 

🇵🇦 La Playita Marina – Panama

🇵🇦 Flamenco Marina – Panama

🇵🇦 Solarte  Marina – Panama

🇵🇦 Turtle Cay Marina – Panama

🇨🇴 ClubNautico Cartagena – Colombia 

🇨🇴 Club de Pesca Marina Cartagena – Colombia 

🇨🇴 Manzanillo Marina Club – Colombia

🇨🇴 Marina Puerto Velero – Colombia

🇨🇴 IGY Marina Santa Marta – Colombia 

🇯🇲 Royal Jamaica Yacht Club – Jamaica 

🇯🇲 Errol Flynn Marina – Jamaica  

🇯🇲 Montego Bay Yacht Club –Jamaica 

🇰🇾 The Barcadere Marina –Cayman Islands 

🇭🇳 Barefoot Cay Marina – Roatan – Honduras 

🇭🇳 Fantasy Island Marina – Roatan – Honduras

🇭🇳 Jonesville Point Marina -Roatan – Honduras  

🇬🇹 Marina Nana Juana Resort & Boatyard – Guatemala 

🇧🇿 Thunderbirds Marine – Placencia – Belize 

🇧🇿 Placencia Yacht Club – Belize 

🇲🇽 Marina Makax – Isla Mujeres – Mexico 

🇲🇽 Marina V&V – Quintana Roo – Mexico 

🇲🇽 Marina El Cid – Cancún – Riviera Maya – Mexico  

🇨🇺 Marina Marlin Nautica Cayo Largo – Cuba 

🇹🇨 South Bank Marina & Boatyard – Turks and Caicos  

🇧🇸 Romora Bay Resort and Marina – Bahamas  

🇧🇸 Elizabeth on the Bay Marina – Bahamas 

🇧🇸 Great Harbour Cay Marina – Bahamas

🇧🇸 Blue Marlin Cove Resort & Marina – Bahamas  

🇩🇴 Ocean World Marina – Dominican Republic

🇩🇴 Marina Puerto Bahia – Dominican Republic    

🇺🇸 Marathon Marina – Marathon Keys 

🇺🇸 Pier 66  Hotel & Marina – Ft. Lauderdale, USA

🇺🇸 Titusville Marina – Florida, USA

🇺🇸 IGY Marina at Ortega Landing – Jacksonville, FL , USA 

🇺🇸 Oasis Marinas at Fernandina Harbor Marina – FL , USA  

🇺🇸 Morningstar Marinas Golden Isles St. Simons Isl. – Georgia, USA  

🇺🇸 Windmill Harbour Marina – Hilton Head South Carolina , USA  

🇺🇸 Coffee Bluff Marina – Savannah Georgia , USA  

🇺🇸 Hazzard Marine – Gerogetown, North Carolina , USA  

🇺🇸 Holden Beach  – Town Dock, North Carolina , USA 

🇺🇸 Portside Marina – Morehead City, North Carolina USA  

🇺🇸 Tideawater Yacht Marina – Portsmouth,  USA  

🇺🇸 Ocean Yacht Marina, Portsmouth, USA  

🇺🇸 Yorktown Riverwalk Landing – Virginia USA  

🇺🇸 Regatta Point Marina – Deltaville, Virginia USA 

🇺🇸 Regent Point Marina – Topping, Virginia USA 

 

15)  PANAMA POSSE SPONSORS 

  • PREDICT WIND
  • SEVENSTAR YACHT TRANSPORT
  • HOME DEPOT PRO MEXICO
  • HERTZ RENTAL CARS  MEXICO
  • YACHT AGENTS GALAPAGOS 
  • FLOR DE CAÑA
  • SAFE HARBOR SOUTH BAY MARINA EVENT CENTER  
  • WESTMARINE PRO
  • SAILMAIL 
  • CHRIS PARKER – MARINE WEATHER CENTER
  • SAN DIEGO MARINE EXCHANGE
  • DOWNWIND MARINE
  • BELIZE TOURISM
  • PANAMA YACHT BROKER
  • LATITUDES AND ATTITUDES  
  • DELTA MIKE MARINE SUPPLY PANAMA
  • SHELTER ISLAND INFLATABLES 

16) PANAMA CANAL AGENT 
CENTENARIO CONSULTING ERICK GALVEZ

To
arrange for transit with the Panama Canal Authority please contact Eric
Galvez our dedicated Panama Canal agent and sponsor of the Panama Posse
and the Pacific Posse

Erick Gálvez

info@centenarioconsulting.com

www.centenarioconsulting.com

Cellphone +507 6676-1376

WhatsApp +507 6676-1376


Erick Gálvez
https://oceanposse.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/new-panama-canal-graphic.jpg
 

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PANAMA POSSE  
 

17) STRATEGIC PARTNERS

 

SEVEN SEAS CRUISING ASSOCIATION

Vicente’s Moorings – Acapulco – Mexico

Park Avenue Villas – San Juan del Sur – Nicaragua

Coconutz – Playa Cocos – Costa Rica

Abernathy – Chandlery – Panama

Pacific Posse 

Atlantic Posse 

Advertising Partners – Las Vegas

Safe-Esteem.com – Delaware

WE OPERATE UNDER INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW

YOUR VESSEL YOUR CREW YOUR RESPONSIBILITY 

 

Panama Posse we sail where the Coconute Grow

 


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